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Theses and Dissertations

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" 'There is something in all this very like democracy' : Cultures of Political Discussion in the Victorian Novel
1 online resource (276 p.) :ill., Inna Yevgenievna VolkovaI examine a strain of Victorian novels that I call "novels of discussion" and their imaginings of various models of political discussion in the public sphere. In their aspiration for the liberal ideals of a "free and equal discussion (15)," to use John Stuart Mill's phrase, these novels articulate a variety of such blueprints that compete with and build on one another. Analyzing the potentialities and internal contradictions of these models, I intervene in three areas of scholarly interest: Victorian liberalism, the form of the novel, and public sphere theory. I focus on Victorian liberalism's investments in the formal organization of political discussion in the public sphere and suggest that the changeability and free play among discussion models lie at the heart of liberalism's project, calling for on an ongoing revision of how to discuss ideas and exchange opinions. I argue that Victorian liberal culture had high stakes in conceiving of the individual's agency in terms of an active discursive presence in the public arena and a collaborative pursuit of "truth" through face-to-face discussion. I seek to show the limitations of a commonly held view among Victorianists that nineteenth-century liberalism privileged privatized interiority and individuated reflection and conceived of social agency through the processes of inward cognition. In contrast, I show that novels often cultivated the argumentative energy and the intersubjective collaboration in discussion as a means to grapple with socio-economic and cultural issues. While I refrain from reading novels as instruments of disciplinary power, I also do not view them as texts that simply propagate a "free and equal discussion." Rather, my close-readings reveal how the novels showcase the progressive potentialities of various discussion models, while also exploring these models' dangers, impracticability, ambivalences, and internal tensions. In an attempt to strive for social justice and inclusion, the novels gesture specifically to face-to-face discussion as a process that facilitates a sincere exchange of opinions, ensures equality based on mutual respect and recognition, and so lays the foundation of democratic sociality. As an artifact of print culture that created a mediated relationship with its anonymous faceless readership, the novel becomes a seemingly paradoxical site of advocating for a face-to-face unmediated political discussion. I do not view this phenomenon as Victorians' nostalgia for the golden age before print. Rather, novelistic representation of face-to-face discussion was a way for Victorian novelists to bring it into full relief. They often self-consciously contrasted face-to-face discussion with the very medium through which it was represented. The project is arranged chronologically, spanning the late 1820's to the Edwardian period of the early twentieth century. The chapters focus on Harriet Martineau's tales of political economy, Benjamin Disraeli's novel Sybil, Charles Reade's Put Yourself in His Place, Walter Besant's All Sorts and Conditions of Men, George Gissing's Demos, and Robert Tressell's The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. While these novels at one time enjoyed widespread popularity, they are no longer staples of Victorian literature today. However, these novels' past popularity suggests that their preoccupation with political discussion reflects crucial facets of Victorian culture. Similar preoccupations, perhaps in less explicit ways, surface in more canonical authors such as Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, and others. In what Walter Bagehot called the "age of discussion," the novels operated as an experimental ground for Victorians' ideals, hopes, and competing views about the public sphere., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF t.p. (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Thesis (Ph.D.)--Michigan State University. English, 2012, Includes bibliographical references.
"'I'M GONE BE 'BLACK ON BOTH SIDES'" : : EXAMINING THE LITERACY PRACTICES AND LEGACY LEARNING WITHIN A SUSTAINING URBAN DEBATE COMMUNITY
The narratives of Black student-debaters are comprised of stories that demonstrate strength, struggle, and success. However, at times, the depictions and portrayals of Black or urban student-debaters are ones that highlight them only as struggling students. Related to this, achievement and literacy gaps continue to widen between whites and students of color (Edwards, 2009, 2011, 2012). One reason for this is the failed efforts to create and sustain literacy programs for marginalized individuals, especially Black youth. When this occurs, in the context of debate, Black student-debaters find it necessary to draw from multiple literacies in an effort to construct counternarratives that speak to their varied realities within urban debate communities. This study explored the lived experiences of Black student-debaters and debate supporters in ACTION Debate (AD), an afterschool debate program dedicated to offering and providing debate opportunities and instruction to high school students in a major Midwestern city. AD believes that regular participation in policy debate can improve study habits and academic success, increase self-confidence, graduation rates, and college scholarship opportunities, and prepare students to succeed in college and in life (National Association for Urban Debate Leagues, 2016). As an individual who has learned in the AD community as a former debater, coach, and supporter for the past 20 years, I argue that the AD space is one that enacts what Paris (2012) defines as culturally sustaining. Additionally, this study examined the ways in which AD serves as a space that promotes the high school to college pipeline. To achieve all of the aforementioned, this project investigated the following questions: 1) How and in what ways is Action Debate (AD) a culturally sustaining space? 2) How do students perceive and understand their participation in Action Debate as relating to debate, school, their communities, and college? 3) Are there specific literacy and culturally sustaining practices that are employed by students, coaches, and debate supporters in the Action Debate program to prepare Black students to debate in racially welcoming or racially hostile environments? The participants featured in this study included eight student-debaters and debate supporters who reside in a major Midwestern city. Data for this study included observations, field notes, video recordings, collected artifacts, and interviews with AD participants and supporters. Data was analyzed by describing and interpreting the participants’ literacy practices and legacy learning, as explained in the various academic and social contexts they occupy. This work exists to illuminate the ways in which they engaged with the AD program while resisting deficit-framed perspectives associated with them. This study also sought to understand the relationship between debate participation and legacy learning. Hoping to inform research-based and practice-based spaces about how Black debaters and debate supporters employ multiple literacies for the advancement of their debate goals, this work finally explored the high school to college debate pipeline. The findings from this study reinforce the importance of literacy and debate within school settings and in out-of-school spaces for Black student-debaters and debate supporters within a sustaining urban debate community., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF title page (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Ph.D. Michigan State University. Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education - Doctor of Philosophy 2016, Includes bibliographical references.
"'Invading Vacationland for Christ' : The Construction of Evangelical Identity through Summer Camps in the Postwar Era"
1 online resource (234 p.) :ill., Evangelical summer camps blossomed in the post–World War II years, more than tripling their numbers from 1945 to 1960. But scholars have yet to explain the phenomenon at this critical juncture in American history. Summer camps provide a lens for how evangelicals saw themselves in an increasingly secular postwar world. Many believed the influence of evangelicals was on the decline, and scholars have indicated the overall waning of the influence of mainline Protestant denominations throughout the twentieth century. But an examination of summer camps reveals that evangelicals desired to engage in mainstream culture through reaching American postwar youth. They consciously worked to influence America's youth in unprecedented ways, appealing to them through the combination of faith and fun, working to attract the growing teenage subculture in order to create and sustain the next generation of evangelical leadership. Summer camps, an innovative approach to reaching America's youth, aided evangelicals as they sought to reassert both a Christian and American identity in the postwar milieu of anxiety and change. The establishment of evangelical summer camps in the 1940s and 1950s demonstrated a clear resurgence of evangelical power. This evangelical power, building on the organizational foundation of the 1940s and 1950s, continued its trajectory into the national spotlight and cultural significance in the late twentieth and early twenty first century. The examination of the diversity of evangelical summer camps through broader historical lenses provides a variety of different ways to unearth how evangelicals went from a sheltered group that supposedly disappeared in the 1920s to their visibility and influence of today. An exploration of the continuing influence of denominational institutions as well as the growing evidence of non–denominational camps revealed the extent to which postwar evangelicals struggled to neatly identify as liberal, modern, or more conservative. An investigation of the construction of gender–based identities explains how evangelicals sometimes fit with existing gender norms, but also the ways they pushed against traditional gender roles by encouraging girls to pursue evangelical careers. A consideration of the issues of race and environmentalism indicates the immense diversity within evangelicalism during the postwar era. Finally, the exploration of the voices of evangelical youth exposes a language of political activism. Evangelical youth believed they were the solution to the world’s problems and that missionizing, political involvement, establishing more Christian institutions, and pursuing world peace were what evangelicals should care about., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF t.p. (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Thesis (Ph.D.)--Michigan State University. History - Doctor of Philosophy, 2013, Includes bibliographical references.
"All of us would walk together" : the transition from slavery to freedom at St. Mary's City, Maryland
1 online resource (374 p.) :ill., "ALL OF US WOULD WALK TOGETHER": THE TRANSITION FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM AT ST. MARY'S CITY, MARYLANDbyTerry Peterkin BrockIn 1840, Dr. John Mackall Brome inherited his father's plantation along the St. Mary's River in St. Mary's County, Maryland. Over the ensuing decades, Brome built his plantation into one of the largest in Southern Maryland, both in acreage and slaveholdings. By the Civil War, his plan- tation landscape had been entirely rebuilt, and was home to over 60 enslaved African Americans. This dissertation examines how Brome managed his plantation during and after slavery, and how African Americans used, reused, modified, and changed the plantation landscape to survive their bondage and define their freedom after slavery.Examining the transition from slavery to freedom has received limited attention in archaeo- logical analysis, and this research introduces a model for understanding the transition through the plantation landscape. The landscape was a critical form of control developed by planters to ef- ficiently produce archaeological crops and manage enslaved laborers. This system, in place for centuries in the American South, was entirely reformed after the emancipation of African Ameri- can laborers. This study will examine how Brome's strategy for managing his labor changed over time, and how African Americans leveraged their newfound freedom to define their freedom and establish independence.This transition is particularly unique in Maryland, which sided with the Union during the Civil War, and which underwent multiple changes in its agricultural economy throughout the 19th cen- tury, transitioning from tobacco to wheat to meat and dairy production. This complicates the traditional narrative of post-Emancipation agricultural relationships between blacks and whites, as Marylander's began producing less labor intensive crops. Meanwhile, African Americans used their new freedoms to change the way they used space to organize their households, build families, and establish communities on and off the plantation.A number of spheres will be interrogated to understand how space was used before and afterslavery. The plantation will be considered as a whole to understand the way the built environment changed through time, including Brome's plantation redesign during the 1840s and its decline through the rest of the century. Brome's use of this landscape to establish control of his slaves and demonstrate his power to his peers will be examined, and how this was effected by the Civil War and Emancipation. For African Americans, a number of spaces on the plantation will be examined, including the plantation proper, the African American domestic sphere, work areas including the manor home, and the wilderness to provide insight into the way that African Americans used space differently after Emancipation. These spaces will be considered in the context of household formation and community building, extending to areas off the plantation.This research demonstrates that Brome used his landscape as a means of controlling his en- slaved laborers and to demonstrate his power through a performative space to his peers. The regular presence of Union soldiers during the Civil War, crippled his control, and provided the necessary cracks for enslaved laborers to resist their bondage and gain freedom. After the War, Brome's agricultural pursuits transition from large sharecropping towards less labor intensive crops and investments in the railroad, resulting in the reduction of his plantation size by the 1880s.Enslaved African Americans reused plantation spaces to create alternate plantation landscapes. They modified their households to mitigate the effects of slavery, and used space on and off the plantation to build communities. After the Civil War, African American reconstituted their fam- ilies into households, and began to separate their community spaces from the white landscape. Instead of reusing space on the plantation, they instead created independent spaces where they could practice family, household and community interactions., Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed on), Thesis (Ph. D.)--Michigan State University. Anthropology, 2014., Includes bibliographical references.
"All the Forms Today are Merely Parades and Arrangements" : The Relationship Between the Music and Film of Le Ballet Mécanique and their Influence on Time
1 online resource (53 p.) :ill., Emily Michelle BaumgartThis paper offers a structural and cognitive exploration of Léger, Murphy and Antheil's Le Ballet Mécanique of 1924. Though much recent literature has addressed the iconic and groundbreaking film by concentrating on the audio or visual elements separately, this paper addresses both as a unit; specifically, it explores the form and structure, or lack thereof, inherent in the abstract nature of the film. While some analyses have claimed there is a clear sense of organization within either film or music (Lawder, 1975; Oja, 2000), this paper takes the opposite approach by theorizing that there is no coherent form to be found in either. Instead, there is a focus on the use of irregular repetition found in both the visual and aural media: looping in the visual element and ostinato in the aural. Furthermore, this study places an emphasis on the effect these unusual techniques will have on an audience. Drawing on the cognitive literature regarding perception and attention, this paper investigates the role that non-narrative video plays in time perception and disorientation. It uses principles of Gestalt psychology and previous timing experiments to accomplish these aims, postulating that the lack of structure, repetitive nature, and disunity between visual and aural elements will lead to a distorted sense of time., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF t.p. (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Thesis (M.M.)--Michigan State University. Music Theory - Master of Music, 2015, Includes bibliographical references.
"Am I My Other's Keeper?" : Alterity, Dialogic Representation and Polyphonic Ethical Discourse in Later Antebellum American Fiction
1 online resource (242 p.) :ill., Hayden White argues that to create a narrative is to “moralize.” As historicists assert, the moral content of a narrative reflects the social, cultural and political discourses in which it is constructed as well as the ethical value systems that such discourses contain. However, context does not reveal the entire story. Mikhail Bakhtin holds that narratives are polyphonic, that is, they contain multiple, competing discourses, at times represented through singular idiolects. But what are these various voices talking about, and to whom? Polyphonic or “carnivalesque” narratives rehearse and contest contrasting ethical paradigms, exposing their discursive limits as well as their transcendent possibilities in a given milieu. Thus, the text manifests the emergence of a dialogic exchange between ethical discourses, the yield of which is a creative destabilization that that resists the archaeological confinement of time, place and ideology. Therefore, I engage an ethical formalist rereading of a selection of antebellum narrative fictions in order to probe the discursive possibilities latent within the texts’ moral imaginaries. In addition to deploying Bakhtin’s work on polyphonic narrative, I use Emmanuel Levinas’ ethical theory of alterity that stresses the moral agent’s duty to respond on behalf of an individualized subject otherwise totalized by an oppressive, thematizing discourse. Whereas Levinas describes the moment of this ethical demand as the face-to-face encounter, I argue that the responsive duty suggested by the instance of inter-subjective recognition is represented within fiction as dialogue, in addition to the more subtle discourses that the narrator adds. Beyond exposing the text’s ethical tensions, these dialogic moments reflect the discursive polyphony theorized by Bakhtin, multi-vocal eruptions often signaled by a perichoresis of distinct idiolects. The works I discuss—James Fenimore Cooper’s Littlepage Trilogy, Herman Melville’s Israel Potter and “Benito Cereno,” Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall and Harriet E. Wilson’s Our Nig—all contain ethical discourses elaborated through idiolectical dialogic structures and polyphony. Furthermore, the context of their production—the late-antebellum United States—situates them within ethical conversations on totalization and interpersonal duty for the Other in that the modernizing republic was struggling with the moral implications of Indian removal, African slavery, urban labor, poverty and gender oppression. Yet, a Levinasian reading of antebellum U.S. literature invites looking beyond ideological power discourses. In addition to reflecting how American republicanism and capitalism of the mid-1800’s totalized, confined and dehumanized disempowered Others, these texts evidence rhetorical ambivalence respecting the status of the differentiated Other and the moral subject’s duty to the Other in a capitalist republic obsessed with categorical ordering and uncomfortable with ambiguity. Despite their concerns with political, social and ethical regulation, though, these polyphonic works contain transcendent ethical counter-discourses on duty and Otherness that expose a symbiosis between radical Others, peoples otherwise divided by contrasting ethical, political, cultural, racial or socioeconomic alignments., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF t.p. (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Thesis (Ph.D.)--Michigan State University. English - Doctor of Philosophy, 2015, Includes bibliographical references.
"As long as I get to be me" : the formative experiences of early career female jazz instrumentalists
1 online resource (ix, 247 p.), With the goal of helping to create a more inclusive environment in which jazz education can flourish, the purpose of this research is to explore the experiences of female early career jazz instrumentalists. Four female jazz instrumentalists whose college experiences were based at the same large university in a Midwestern state served as the participants for this qualitative instrumental case study. Data sources included individual interviews, a focus group interview, and field notes based on observations of two participants' rehearsals and performances. Six major themes with sub-themes emerged from this study: (1) Perceptions of the influence of gender, (2) Influence of perceptions of place, (3) Influence of supportive relationships, (4) Resilience through personal characteristics, (5) Beneficial dispositions for improvisation, and (6) Salient improvisation teaching and learning approaches. Based on the findings, I recommended that music educators be cognizant of the overt and nuanced ways that gender can impact their students' experiences. This awareness could help educators recognize and minimize gendered preconceptions that could be perpetuated within their classrooms and facilitate an informed approach toward addressing gender-related challenges. Particular attention to the social dynamics among students may help to cultivate mutually respectful peer relationships. Students could benefit from both theoretical and aural approaches to improvisation learning as well as extensive opportunities to apply and enhance their abilities through performance., Thesis (M.M.)--Michigan State University. Music Education, 2013., Includes bibliographical references (p. 241-247)., Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed on Nov. 27, 2013)
"BEING A GOOD PERSON IN THE SYSTEM WE ALREADY HAVE WILL NOT SAVE US : " INTERPRETING HOW STUDENTS EMBODY AND NARRATE THE PROCESS OF SOCIAL CHANGE FOR SUSTAINABILITY USING AN AGENCY/STRUCTURE LENS
1 online resource (273 p.) :ill., When undergraduates studying sustainability take action to make the change they want to see in their own lives, their communities, and the world, they often meet large, seemingly ossified systems that deflate their sense of efficacy. These students enter our classes and programs with a passion to effect change. The participants in this research, for example, dedicated a semester of their undergraduate careers to move to an ecological field station to study sustainability. During this semester, participants worked to develop solutions to local environmental problems, but met various barriers to change during this process. How do students respond to these barriers? How do we, as educators, help construct opportunities for social transformation in the face of unsustainable, unjust, and inequitable systems? Using the agency/structure dialectic as a theoretical lens, this qualitative case study examined how students (a) narrate the process of social change for sustainability at various spatial scales, and (b) embody agency to work towards change for sustainability in their local contexts. Results suggest that students’ local experiences with sustainability work (e.g., classes, community problem-solving projects) are predictive of the way they then envision the process of social change for sustainability in abstract, leading to new and revised imagined futures. Results also suggest that not all students’ agency played a central role in shaping local systems, and therefore the ways they envision social change happening were constrained by their positionalities and experiences within their local communities.Implications for environmental and sustainability education programs include a call for long-term, collective action to (a) help our students examine their own narrated dialectics in time and space, (b) ensure our students have equitable opportunities to engage in local sustainability work, (c) develop a critical consciousness in predominantly White institutions about how local dialectics privilege White American narratives, (d) rethink what “local” means for racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse students in rural American spaces, and (e) consider how our students’ local experiences with sustainability and working for social change impacts their learning., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF t.p. (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Thesis (Ph.D.)--Michigan State University. Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education - Doctor of Philosophy, 2016, Includes bibliographical references.
"Bold at the desk and the stove" : the re-imagining of American cuisine in the work of M.F.K. Fisher and Julia Child
1 online resource (319 p.) :ill., Though often residing on the periphery of literary scholarship, the work of food studies and feminist scholars on the literatures of American domesticity and cookbooks, or collectively "domestic literacies," reveal a significant and too often ignored aspect of our nation's history--the everyday lives of ordinary citizens. While many of these scholars emphasize the intersection of labor, economics, and gender issues, culinary practice is an effective--and often overlooked--lens through which we can examine how gender roles developed in a particular historical moment, how domesticity reflected the economic and sociopolitical discursive practices of the time, and how the nation's relationship to food evolved. Clearly arranging the multitude of discursive practices and domestic literacies involved in one historical period can be difficult; however, systems theory can serve as an effective method for organizing and comprehending how these discursive practices and texts are networked, how they inform and shape each other, how they co-evolve, and how they act recursively and reflexively.Examining domestic literacies from a specific historical moment, such as the immediate post-World War II era in which gender roles experienced scrutiny and American cuisine suffered an identity crisis, proves more productive than tackling a broad scope of texts. Authors M.F.K. Fisher and Julia Child operate individually and collectively to create perturbations to the network of discursive practice systems that neighbor their texts. They work alongside and challenge texts, such as Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book that articulate problematic discourses about gender and domesticity, to reveal the complicated and multifarious relationship among domestic literacies, culinary practice, and this network. By examining these texts, we can further comprehend how the authors reshape the network of discursive practice systems and work to initiate the Good Food Movement that overhauls American cuisine and helps to construct the mid-century American national culinary identity.The iconic Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book serves as a representative text of the many domestic literacies in this period that functioned prescriptively and proffered conservative ideas of gender and domesticity. Though most often read simply as a cookbook, this text, when considered as part of the domestic literacies subsystem, reveals the multiple networked systems at work that shape the content of the text and how it is organized and structured. While Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book advocates a return to the kitchen for American women to serve their families, prolific food writer M.F.K. Fisher challenges such a linear and austere approach to culinary practice and gender in her text Map of Another Town. At the same time, in the early 1960s, Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking debuted and changed the American culinary landscape; it also operated alongside Fisher's work to change and shape American culinary practice. Decades later, Child's memoir, My Life in France, centering on the time leading up to the publication of her groundbreaking text sets the stage for the fundamental components of Mastering the Art of French Cooking and the broader culinary practice-as-art. Together, these texts, as a networked representative microcosm of the domestic literacies subsystem, function interdependently with the neighboring discursive practice systems, such as gender, labor, and economics, to alter American cuisine, culinary practice, and gender roles connected with the kitchen., Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed on), Thesis (Ph. D.)--Michigan State University. English, 2014., Includes bibliographical references.
"Busie Head" Liberalism
Contemporary liberal theory has left us unable to generally understand and respond to the rise of political forces like populism, right-wing authoritarianism, and charismatic demagogues. I argue that the dangerousness of these movements is amplified by the inability of our liberal thinking to adequately grapple with messy “political” reality. My goal is to recast liberalism so as to tell us a more coherent story of our political life. I find this in John Locke’s discussion of the “busie head” in his Second Treatise, and in his discussion of the “busie mind” in his Essay and Conduct, and finally in his discussion of the “tutor” in his book on education. Though he mentions the busie head only once in the Second Treatise (and not again), I argue that understanding the role and character of the busie head is paramount for us to understand a liberalism that does not lapse into an ideal theory. The busie head helps us see just how important the “art of governing” is for liberalism. Locke makes a distinction in politics between the more theoretical and formalistic teachings about the nature and origins of government, and the more dynamic “art of governing,” in which Locke says we ought to follow the teaching of books like Aristotle’s Rhetoric. My argument about the importance of the busie head is that this is the guide of the “people,” much like the tutor is to his pupil, and without the busie head liberalism cannot survive. The busie head (just like the tutor) must persuade her audience not by rational demonstrations, but through the fear and suspicion. From my perspective, then, Locke cannot hold—as we do today—that fear is bad, but, rather, that fear has its benefit when rightly used., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF title page (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., Ph.D. Michigan State University. Political Science - Doctor of Philosophy 2016, Includes bibliographical references.
"Can you help me?" : exploring the influence of a mentoring program on high school males' of color academic engagement and self-perception in school
1 online resource (xv, 196 p.) :digital, PDF file, ill., "The dissertation was guided by this major question: How do high school males of color describe and make sense of their academic engagement in school and self-perception while participating in an ecologically structured school-based mentoring program? For the ten high school males of color in this study I do an in-depth analysis using program observations, interviews, and data from journal writings to examine the meaning of their experiences in the program"--From abstract., Thesis (Ph. D.)--Michigan State University. Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy, 2011., Includes bibliographical references (p. 191-196)., Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed on Feb. 21, 2012)
"Dream" Futures : : Storytelling Practices on Pinterest
This paper details research exploring how young women tell their stories on the website Pinterest. These stories are complicated by their religious identities and the negotiation between the dream and the real in relationship to their futures and the ideologies they believe in. They are also complicated by the historical relationship between women, religion, and reduced educational opportunities and expectations. The research was conducted over an 18-month period using a mixed methods design, including recording of pins, visual and textual coding, interviews, and observations. To define some of the past and current teachings from these communities for women, “purity manuals” and other religious texts were used. This work is based in both participant and community based research, as I am a participant both on Pinterest and in the religious community. This research will provide insights into youth digital composing practices, increase understanding of the impact religious culture has on young women and will explore how this culture impacts their dreams and future plans., Description based on online resource. Title from PDF title page (Michigan State University Fedora Repository, viewed )., M.A. Michigan State University. Critical Studies in Literacy and Pedagogy - Master of Arts 2016, Includes bibliographical references.

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